HIMSS is on FHIR

Bed babes tout their wares
Bed, not booth babes

This year’s Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society conference in Chicago is a veritable candy store of high-tech healthcare. Yes the smart hospital beds and baby monitoring bracelets are fascinating. But perhaps the highest impact, most impressive technology on offer is what you can’t see—the software. Though it has about as much shazam as a bed pan, the coming health communication infrastructure known as HL7 FHIR (pronounced like “fire”) will allow access to the coveted Electronic Health Record (EHR) via many new applications and devices.

An easy to read diagram
An easy to read diagram

Also very impressive and a bit more visible were the beautiful mobile workflow apps like Nextgen’s “Go for iPad.” What I like about this electronic health record and dictation recording tool is that it does not do everything. The heavy lifting of setting up records is done on the desktop (templating in healthcare parlance), and on-the-go actions such as dictation and prescription refills, can be executed in short order on the iPad.

NextGen Go
NextGen Go

I also learned that Greenway, a software provider of Practice Management (PM) and EHR tools, has an app marketplace (think iTunes). Topping their offering is Phreesia, a check-in app for iPad can replace all that form filling in the doctor’s office with a few taps of a touchscreen.

The Internet of Things (IoT) was also present, from Tyco’s tracking bracelets, for babies and elders, to decibel logging sensors that monitor noise levels. Quietyme, a HealthBox and Gener8tor accelerator graduate, establishes a mesh network of small volume monitors in each hospital room, the corridor, nurses station, etc. They perform some fancy data analytics (in partnership with Miosoft and Zero Locus). CEO John Bialk says that by comparing noise levels in patient rooms with patient surveys, they can document and predict which noisy areas are having a negative impact on healing. And from Ascom, voice over internet protocol (VoIP) portable devices are like little cordless phones that nurses can use on the local area network (LAN). Their Android device even supports internet instant messaging.

Mesh networking decibel monitor
Mesh networking decibel monitor

Thank you to all those who visited with Concrete Interactive, and those who described their wonderful products, software, services and innovation.

Chris Isham from Sidus BioData, Chris Andreski from Ascom, Suzy Fulton from Greenway, Bernard Echiverri from Corepoint, Piers Nash from University of Chicago, Ben Bush from Orchard Software, Mark Lynch from Tyco Security Products, Huey Zoroufy from Quietyme, Matt Ward from Imprivata, Stevie Bahu from Modis Health IT, Michael Hultner from Lockheed Martin, Sungsoo Kang from Samsung.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *